Class action compensation claims

The GDPR provides supervisory authorities the power to issue huge administrative fines (and we have seen the ICO demonstrate its intent to levy such fines). It also provides individuals with the right to seek compensation against controllers and processors which fail to comply with its provisions. This is set to provide fertile ground for claimants bringing actions in this area, and we expect the number of claims for data protection violations to increase significantly over the course of 2020.

Of particular interest, is the rising number of class actions being brought for data protection related offences.

Towards the end of 2019, in the case of Lloyd v Google LLC, the Court of Appeal overturned an earlier decision of the High Court, allowing proceedings to be served against Google in the US for its allegedly unlawful use of cookies on iPhone users’ devices from a period running from 2011 to 2012. This secret use of cookies (referred to as the “Safari workaround” in the case) allowed Google to gather and subsequently sell certain user data.

The decision of the Court of Appeal was significant since it allowed the case to be brought on behalf of all iPhone users affected by Google’s conduct over the relevant period on an opt-out basis. The Court of Appeal found this to be acceptable since all members of the class had the same “interests” (i.e. they had all suffered the same alleged wrong). This could potentially have broad ramifications in the area of data protection since violations will often impact upon a large number of individuals, rather than being one-off events affecting specific individuals (e.g. where an organisation is sending marketing communications to its entire mailing list unlawfully).

Many commentators have therefore suggested that the decision by the Court of Appeal in Lloyd v Google LLC could result in the floodgates opening for class action claims in relation to data protection violations. To a certain extent, this has already materialised, with a number of data protection class actions currently being fought out in the UK courts. Organisations which have suffered security incidents would appear to be at particular risk, with each of Morrisons, Equifax and British Airways currently litigating class actions in the aftermath of high-profile data breaches.

While the amounts awarded to individuals may be modest, in the event of a class action involving a large number of claimants, the potential total damages could dwarf the fines that could be imposed by the regulator.

Return to Data Privacy Day 2020 index

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