New ePrivacy Regulation – implications for Ad-tech

Josey Bright
Josey Bright

On 10 January this year, the European Commission published a proposal for a new ePrivacy Regulation (the “ePrivacy Regulation”) to update and replace the current ePrivacy Directive (the “Directive”).

The ePrivacy Regulation, which is part of the Commission’s Digital Single Market Strategy, is designed to closely align with the provisions of the General Data Protection ePrivacy Regulation (GDPR) which was adopted in May 2016. The Commission intends that the ePrivacy Regulation will come into force on the same date as the GDPR, the 25 May 2018. However, as it is still yet to be finalised and approved this timetable may be overly ambitious.  It is currently reported that the aim is to finalise the ePrivacy Regulation by end 2018.

As it is a ePrivacy Regulation, just like the GDPR, it will be directly applicable in all EU Member States without the need for implementing national laws.

The main aim of the ePrivacy Regulation is to increase privacy protection for users of electronic communications.

The key features of the proposed ePrivacy Regulation are:

  1. Broader scope

 The new ePrivacy Regulation will apply to any company processing data in connection with communication services including all providers of electronic communications services.

This includes “over-the-top” service providers such as text message, email and messaging app providers so services such as WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger and Skype will be within scope of the ePrivacy Regulation.

Like the GDPR, the ePrivacy Regulation will have an extended reach in that non-EU providers providing electronic services to users in the EU will also be within scope of the ePrivacy Regulation.

  1. Content and metadata included

 All electronic communications data are cover by the ePrivacy Regulation. However, the ePrivacy Regulation distinguishes between content data (what is actually said in the communication) and metadata (data related to the communication such as time, location and duration of a call or website visit). Separate rules apply in respect of each type of data:

  • Content can only be used if the end user has consented to its use for a specified purpose and the processing is necessary for the provision of the service.
  •  Metadata can only be use where it is necessary for the quality of the service such as billing, payments, detecting and/or stopping fraudulent or abusive use of the service.

In circumstances where all end users have consented to the use of content or metadata for a purpose which cannot be fulfilled if the information is anonymised, the data may be used provided that the service provider has consulted the competent EU Data Protection Authority (in the UK, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO)) before the processing is carried out.

The threshold for consent under the ePrivacy Regulation is defined by reference to the GDPR. This means consent must be “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous” given by “a statement or by a clear affirmative action”. Like the GDPR, end users must also be given the right to withdraw their consent at any time.

  1. Storage and erasure of data required

The ePrivacy Regulation includes provisions requiring service providers to erase or anonymise all content after it is received by the end user.

All metadata must also be erased or anonymised once the permitted purpose has been fulfilled, except where such data is required for billing purposes.

  1. Cookie consent options

Like the Directive, the ePrivacy Regulation also provides that the consent of the end user is required for the use of cookies and similar technology. However, the current proposal is that consent can be built into the browser software set-up so that users can tailor their cookie consent choices at the point of installation, rather than by using cookie banners and pop ups.

In addition, analytics cookies which are non-privacy intrusive will not require consent (i.e. those which measure web audience measuring, remember shopping cart details or login information for the same session).

  1. Direct marketing rules

The ePrivacy Regulation distinguishes between business to consumer communications (B2C) and business to business communications (B2B).

Like the Directive, unsolicited commercial communications are not permitted. In B2C marketing prior consent (opt-in) is required. Consent will not be required where marketing similar products or services but a right to object must be provided.

For B2B marketing, the ePrivacy Regulation allows for Member States to determine that the legitimate interests of corporate end users are sufficiently protected from unsolicited communication.

  1. Enforcement and higher fines in line with GDPR

The Information Commission’s Office (ICO) will be responsible for enforcement of the ePrivacy Regulation and the GDPR in the UK.

Currently, ICO can only fine companies up to £500,000 for breaches of the PECR (the national legislation which implements the Directive).  The ePrivacy Regulation introduces fine which are in line with the GDPR (i.e. up to 20,000,000 EUR or 4% of total worldwide annual turnover, whichever is higher).

In addition, the ePrivacy Regulation confers users electronic communications services  with a right to seek compensation directly from services providers if they have “suffered material or non-material damage as a result of an infringement”.

Implications

The ePrivacy Regulation is critically important for many ad-tech businesses where the need to get specific opt in consent could be highly problematic for intermediaries who do not have a direct relationship with the end users and where soliciting that consent via publishers while legally possible may be impracticable.

All this is not helped by the fact that there is uncertainty around the final form of the ePrivacy Regulation; for example, as to whether valid consent can be managed within the browser.

As if compliance with GDPR did not present enough challenges, the ad-tech industry, as well as individual businesses, need to move quickly to prepare for these forthcoming changes in ePrivacy.

 

Josey Bright is an associate in the commerce & technology team at City law firm Fox Williams LLP and can be contacted at jbright@foxwilliams.com